Skip to main content.
Currently:84.2°F Night time, Dry, Scattered clouds
Night time, Dry, Scattered clouds
Comfort Index: Warm
 Updated21-Sep-2017 9:00pm @ 
 
Time of Next Full Update: 9:05 pm -  Station Elev: 1469 ft  
Pepper Ridge North Valley - Tropical Navigation Menu
Pepper Ridge North Valley - Main Naviagation Menu

Weather Links:

       Home Page 

      Current Weather 

           Forecast Page 

          Historical Data

           Live Lightning 

            Monsoon Info 

        Satellite/Radar 

       Station Info

     Tropical Weather

        Weather Ed. 101 

          Weather Links 

      Weather Photos 

  Weather Warnings

       More Wthr Links 

New FeatureNew Feature
N.O.A.A Radio

Celebrating
12 Years on the web
2005 - 2017

& 20+ Years of Data
1997 - 2017
At Pepper Ridge

 Weather Reports: 
Monsoon 2017New Feature
 Highlights. 

Monsoon 2016
 Highlights. 

Monsoon 2015
 Review. 


Member of the:
Weather Topsites

Lower Sidebar Page
Pepper Ridge Weather Station
USA Weather Finder
United States Weather Group
Wunderground

Sky Warn

CWOP 3794 Quality Control Logo
CW 3794

For more information
about this site
contact the
Web Master

Willow Fire Pyro Cumulus Cloud

Return to Top
of Page

Welcome to Cloud Types Indentification Page

Clouds Types And Information


Cloud Type Indentification Chart

Cloud Chart


High Cloud Types

Cirrus Cirrostratus Cirrocumulus
Cirrus
Cirrostratus
Cirrocumulus

Cirrus is a high level cloud composed of ice crystals and appears in many forms, often these clouds appear with streams of virga, which is rain or snowflakes that evaporate
as its falls into the lower warmer air.

Cirrostratus is a filmy layer of milky-white ice crystal cloud normally covering the entire sky. The cloud can sometimes be 5,000 - 10,000 feet in thickness.

Cirrocumulus is still higher water droplet cloud with smaller cloud elements resembling scales on the back of a fish, thus the term mackeral sky.

Base elevation:25,000-30,000 feet

Top elevation: 35,000-50,000 feet

Base elevation:20,000-25,000 feet

Top elevation: 30,000-40,000 feet

Base elevation: 15,000-18,000 feet

Top elevation: 20,000-30,000 feet

Mid Level Cloud Types

Altocumulus Altostratus Cumulus Mammantus
Altocumulus
Altostratus
Cumulus Mammantus

Altocumulus is a high layer of lumpy cloud elements. Lumps show the presence of rising air; thin regions show descending air. Sometimes it is described as a buttermilk sky.

Altostratus is a layer of gray water droplet cloud of uniform thickness. The sun can be seen as a difuse image. As time passes, this cloud often lowers and thickens to become nimbostatus with rain.

Cumulus mammatus is a low to mid level cloud often associated with mature thunderstorms. These clouds ofter appear in the vicinity of these thunderstorms. They tend appear beneath the tops of a cumulonimbus cloud. This is an indication of very active updrafts and downdrafts and can be a sign of severe weather.

Base elevation:12,000 - 15,000 feet

Top elevation: 15,000 - 20,000 feet

Base elevation:12,000 - 15,000 feet

Top elevation: 15,000 - 20,000 feet

Base elevation: 10,000 - 15,000 feet

Top elevation: 20000 - 25,000 feet

Low Cloud Types

Stratus Stratocumulus Cumulus
Stratus
Stratocumulus
Cumulus

Stratus is a low gray cloud mass usaully associated with winter storms this clouds presence may lead to widespread and continuous rain or snow falls.

Stratocumulus is a low layer of grayish cloud showing lumpy thick/thin regions. It is a very common cloud type. At one time the cumulus activity may prevail; at another, the stratus form may prevail.

Cumulus are flattish-based heaps or mounds of cloud with rounded tops well separated from each other. They may develop vertially with time

Base elevation: 1,000 - 2,000 feet

Top elevation: 10,000 - 15,000 feet

Base elevation: 6,000 - 8,000 feet

Top elevation: 10,000 - 15,000 feet

Base elevation: 2,000 - 3,000 feet

Top elevation: 4,000 - 6,000 feet

Low Cloud Types with Vertical Development

Cumulus Conjestus Towering Cumulus Cumulonimbus with Anvil
Cumulocongestus
Towering Cumulus
Cumulonimbus with Anvil

Cumulus Congestus are puffy clouds which are just starting vertical development. Congestus denotes a cloud with active vertical development. These clouds can lead to the development of thunderstorms and cumulonimbus clouds.

Towering Cumulus is the second stage in the development of a Cumulonimbus cloud. Depending on atmosphere conditions this cloud may mature in a Cumulonimbus cloud or thunderstorm. These cloud have a billowy characteristic with clean sharp edges and a cauiflower shape. As the The top continues to rise, (grow in height), it is most likely composed of ice crystals.

Cumulonimbus with Anvil - This cloud is most advanced form of the cumulus family. It is a mature storm where the top of the cloud has fanned out and is most likely composed of ice crystals and it is a indicatered of possible severe weather , with Heavy rain , hail, lightning and thunder, and tornados are possible in this savage cloud.

Base elevation: 1,000 - 2000 feet

Top elevation: 10,000 - 15,000 feet

Base elevation: 3,000 - 5,000 feet

Top elevation: 20,000 - 50,000 feet

Base elevation: 2,000-3,000 feet

Top elevation: 40,000 - 60,000 + feet

Low Cloud Types with Precipitation

Nimbostratus Cumulonimbus Super Cell Cumulonimbus
Nimbostratus
Cumulonimbus
Cumulonimbus with Anvil

Nimbostratus is a gray cloud mass from which widespread and continuous rain or snow falls. This cloud is usually associated with low pressure frontal systems and winter weather storms it is also associated with a warm front storm system.

Cumulonimbus is the one of the most advanced stages of the cumulus family. The top is likely composed of ice crystals. It is no longer sharp edged, but fuzzy. The top sometimes takes the shape of an anvil. Heavy rain showers, hail, lightning and thunder, are possible in this savage cloud.

Supercell Cumulonimbus with Anvil - This cloud is example of a large Thunderstorm Complex. It is a mature storm where severe weather is likely. Heavy rain , hail, lightning and thunder, and tornados are possible in this thunderstorm Complex.

Base elevation: 1,000 - 2000 feet

Top elevation: 10,000 - 15,000 feet

Base elevation: 3,000 - 5,000 feet

Top elevation: 30,000 - 50,000 feet

Base elevation: 2,000-3,000 feet

Top elevation: 40,000 - 60,000 + feet


     All cloud type photos are copyrighted © 2005 - 2010 by Pepper Ridge North Valley Weather - All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or      distribution is prohibited. Please also check out the Weather Glossary with over 950 weather related terms and definitions.


Member of the:
LightningRing
TiggrWeather Topsites Top 100 Weather Sites

 Pepper Ridge North Valley Random Weather Facts

DEW POINT
Dew point is the temperature to which air must be cooled for saturation (100% relative humidity) to occur. The dew point is an important measurement used to predict the formation of dew, frost, and fog. If dew point and temperature are close together in the late afternoon when the air begins to turn colder, fog is likely during the night. Dew point is also a good indicator of the air's actual water vapor content, unlike relative humidity, which takes the air's temperature into account. High dew point indicates high vapor content; low dew point indicates low vapor content. In addition a high dew point indicates a better chance of rain and severe thunderstorms. You can even use dew point to predict the minimum overnight temperature. Provided no fronts or other weather pattern changes are expected overnight, the afternoon's dew point gives you an idea of what minimum temperature to expect overnight.

Get the Facts PHP



Page layout last updated on Mar 5th, 2008